A Corpus-assisted Discourse Analysis of Chiptune-related Practices Discussed within Chipmusic.org

This study examined 245,098 discussion forum posts within a website dedicated to chiptunes, which are electronic music compositions or performances either emulating the sounds of or created through early computer and video game sound chips. Corpus-assisted discourse analysis tools and techniques assisted with revealing patterns of discourse across 10,892,645 words written between December 30th, 2009 and November 13th, 2017 within chipmusic.org.

Findings indicate seven interconnected themes of chiptune-related practices that demonstrate potential transdisciplinary connections between computer science education and music education: (a) music composition practices, (b) music performance practices, (c) maker practices, (d) coding practices, (e) entrepreneurial practices, (f) visual art practices, and (g) community practices. Abstract continues . . .

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Augmenting Programmatic Music

This interactive session explores augmenting programmatic music through a variety of technology. The session begins with a brief presentation on how we augmented programmatic music performed by a community band I worked with. Following the brief presentation, we will work together to augment a programmatic piece of music. The session will end with a discussion on what could be learned in a project like this and how we might implement similar projects in the settings we facilitate. A laptop or tablet is recommended for this session.

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Exploring Music and Video Games

This interactive session explores the nexus of music and video games. We will make live music to live video game play and discuss considerations for implementation in general music classes.

NOTE: This session was originally scheduled as an hour long session with lecture, interaction, and discussion; however, this session was booked for the same time as another session I am presenting. Because of this conflict, I have curated resources below I would have mentioned in the lecture portion of the proposed session.

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Exploring Music Through Coding

This interactive session explores the nexus of music and coding (computer programming). We will collaboratively explore music making and learning through multiple programming languages and discuss how the elementary kids I work with make music through code.

NOTE: This session was originally scheduled as an hour long session with lecture, interaction, and discussion; however, this session was booked for the same time as another session I am presenting. Because of this conflict, I have curated resources below I would have mentioned in the lecture portion of the proposed session.

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A K-8 Nexus Between Music Creation, Sound Design, and Computer Programming

This interactive session explores an elementary nexus between music creation, sound design, and computer programming. The session begins with a brief presentation on some of the ways the kids I work with explore music creation, sound design, and computer programming, all within K-8 computer programming classes. Following this brief presentation, we will work together or independently to modify the music, sound, or code from a variety of example projects. The session will end with a discussion on what could be learned in a project like this and how we might implement similar projects in the settings we facilitate. A laptop is recommended for this session.

 

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Emerging Music Nexuses: Technology, Video Games, and Coding

This discussion-based presentation focuses on three emerging music nexuses: 1) music performance and technology; 2) music and video games; and 3) music and coding. The presentation slides below provide many resources related to these nexuses; however, the discussion revolving around this presentation are not limited to these nexuses. I intend for this presentation to be a springboard for discussion on emerging music nexuses and their implications in music education/facilitation.

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Coding Live Music with Sonic Pi

This interactive session explores the nexus between computer programming and performing music. Sonic Pi is a platform that uses the programming language Ruby to create live music by writing out lines of code. We will walk through creating a hip version of "Hot Cross Buns" in Sonic Pi, explore more potentials involved with the nexus between computer programming and music, and conclude with a group discussion. No coding experience is required; however, a laptop is encouraged.

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Multimedia Ensemble: Performing Live Music with Live Video Games

This presentation focuses on a multimedia ensemble that created live music and sounds (acoustic and digital) to live video games. The session explores the successes, failures, and musical problems experienced within the ensemble as well as the specific software and hardware used by the ensemble. The session concludes with a discussion on future ensemble possibilities for music and sound with multimedia experiences.

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Sonic Modding: Modding Video Game Music and Sound

This interactive session explores modding the music and sound of video games. The session begins with a brief presentation on software and hardware modifications that can be done to create music and sounds within and through video games. Following the brief presentation, we will begin modding the music and sounds of the video game Left 4 Dead 2 by finding and/or recording new music and/or sounds for the game. The session will end with a discussion on what could be learned in a project like this and how it can be implemented in the settings we facilitate in.

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Interacting with 8-bit

The early technological constraints imposed on 8-bit composers can act as project criteria for composing and performing 8-bit music that interacts with live 8-bit video games. This two hour session will begin with an interaction with 8-bit media and then break out into groups to create short musical excerpts and sound effects for a live video game. After all of the groups share what they created, the session concludes with a discussion on musical problems, technological constraints impacting creativity, and future projects. 

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From Large Ensembles to Video Games: Technology in Music Education

In the past couple decades, instrumental education has evolved relatively very little in comparison to technology. Understanding how to augment music education through technology is vital to the growth of our field. This presentation provides some suggestions for using technology in instrumental settings to expand possibilities for both performing and teaching.

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