Individualized Learning through Rhizomatic Design

While group-based learning through a sequence can be a useful approach for elected classes as it is easier to assume student "buy in" or motivation, group-based learning can be a difficult approach for mandated classes that include students who do not wish to attend the class or are initially uninterested in CS. In addition, group-based learning is often based on the pacing of the average student, which is a pace that is often too fast or slow for students who fall outside of the class average. This poster, and the resulting discussions, posits a rhizomatic approach to curricular and experience design that encourages individualized learning within group settings. Rather than moving through CS concepts and practices in a prescribed sequence, a rhizomatic approach encourages self-directed learning along multiple paths or an entirely undefined path. This poster challenges educators to question in what ways the curricula and pedagogies they are familiar with might be modified to encourage equitable learning for a multitude of axiologies (values) or ontologies (ways of being) by creating a space for interests to guide learning.

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A Corpus-assisted Discourse Analysis of Chiptune-related Practices Discussed within Chipmusic.org

This study examined 245,098 discussion forum posts within a website dedicated to chiptunes, which are electronic music compositions or performances either emulating the sounds of or created through early computer and video game sound chips. Corpus-assisted discourse analysis tools and techniques assisted with revealing patterns of discourse across 10,892,645 words written between December 30th, 2009 and November 13th, 2017 within chipmusic.org.

Findings indicate seven interconnected themes of chiptune-related practices that demonstrate potential transdisciplinary connections between computer science education and music education: (a) music composition practices, (b) music performance practices, (c) maker practices, (d) coding practices, (e) entrepreneurial practices, (f) visual art practices, and (g) community practices. Abstract continues . . .

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An Exploratory Correlational Study among Music Scholarships, Average Amount of Hours Practiced, and Obsessive-Compulsive Traits

The purpose of this exploratory study was to investigate correlations of obsessive-compulsive traits, amount of hours practiced, and music scholarships. Participants included 150 undergraduate and graduates students who were attending a school of music located in the southwest region of the United States. Participants completed an online questionnaire which included inquiries related to demographics, music scholarships, average amount of time practiced, obsessive-compulsive traits, and whether they had been diagnosed in the past by a medical professional as having an obsessive-compulsive disorder. Findings indicate statistically significant correlations between obsessive-compulsive traits and amount of hours spent practicing. While there were limited statistically significant correlations between obsessive-compulsive traits and music scholarships, 88.89% (n = 9) of those diagnosed with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and 100% (n = 2) of those diagnosed with Obsessive-Compulsive Personality Disorder were currently on or previously received music scholarships. Findings also indicate a positive correlation between the average amount of time spent practicing and music scholarships. 

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Talent: A Review of Literature

This poster highlights key findings on literature discussing talent in relation to synonyms and definitions, historical perspectives, nature vs nurture, deliberate practice, changes in the brain, context and implications, and questions for future research. A QR code is provided to direct people to the paper this poster is based on.

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