Posts tagged Projects
Getting Started with Elementary CS

In Arizona (and many other states), districts are just getting started with elementary coding and CS education initiatives; however, teachers and administrators are often unsure where to get started. While high school CS is often guided by AP or dual enrollment criteria, elementary educators are often asked to implement CS standards without guidance on how or what elementary CS education could look like. This Birds of a Feather session intends to provide a space for elementary educators and administrators to ask questions as well as share tips and tools for getting started with computer science.

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Project-based Learning with Scratch (ISTE)

This presentation begins with an introduction to various approaches of project-based learning with Scratch; for example, backwards, inquiry-based, and emergent project designs. The second portion of this session is an interactive exploration of free Scratch project examples and resources I have developed.

The purpose of this session is twofold: a) provide an introduction to different types of project-based learning (e.g., backwards, inquiry-based, and emergent design) and how they lie on the project continuum (i.e., fixed, flexible, or open), and b) to give time to allow attendees to explore the free project-based resources I have created for Scratch. Everyone will walk away with dozens of lesson plans and resources to get them started with project-based learning with Scratch.

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Introduction to Ipsative Assessment

This lightning talk introduces ipsative assessment, which is an assessment undertaken by a student for the purpose of learning through reflection on prior work. This process differs from self-assessment where students evaluate their own efforts or results without making connections to prior creations or demonstrations of understandings. I begin this session by briefly reviewing applications of formative and summative assessment techniques and then introduce ipsative assessment as another possibility for assessing student work. After this brief introduction, I elaborate by providing examples of how I used ipsative assessment within the K-8 coding classes I designed and facilitated, and conclude the lightning talk by sharing assessment resources I created for elementary CS education professional development sessions.

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Interest-driven Coding Projects

This ignite talk describes considerations for designing interest-driven coding projects with Scratch. I provide examples of what an interest-driven coding class looks like and how projects are designed for a variety of experience levels and interests within a shared space. I discuss some of the research informing this approach, share examples of interest-driven projects, and provide suggestions for creating interest-driven coding projects and resources.

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Project-based Learning with Scratch (CSTA)

This presentation begins with an introduction to various approaches of project-based learning with Scratch; for example, backward, inquiry-based, and emergent project designs. The second portion of this session is an interactive exploration of free Scratch project examples and resources I have developed, so bring your laptop to explore and create projects with Scratch. The session will conclude with an open Q&A on project-based learning with Scratch.

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Interacting with 8-bit

The early technological constraints imposed on 8-bit composers can act as project criteria for composing and performing 8-bit music that interacts with live 8-bit video games. This two hour session will begin with an interaction with 8-bit media and then break out into groups to create short musical excerpts and sound effects for a live video game. After all of the groups share what they created, the session concludes with a discussion on musical problems, technological constraints impacting creativity, and future projects. 

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Modern Video Game Projects

This session will explore potential projects that involve creating music to modern video games. We will also explore how video games can be used to explore technology, music theory, music history, composing, and performing with modern video games. Experience with video games is not required as the focus is on the unique musical affordances students can experience when creating music to video games. Please feel free to bring an instrument as we will experience a mini project that requires everyone to musically contribute to a live video game in the session.

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Old School Video Game Projects

This session will explore potential projects that involve composing and performing music in the 8-bit aesthetic. We will also explore how the 8-bit aesthetic can be used to explore technology, music theory, and music history through composing and performing with 8-bit video games. Experience with video games is not required as the focus is on the unique musical affordances students can experience when composing and performing music to old school video games. Please feel free to bring a laptop with a way to write music notation as we will create and perform music to a live video game in the session. 

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Engaging with Popular and Participatory Cultures: Implications for Music Teaching and Learning by Tobias, E., Box, C., Johnston, N., & O’Leary, J.

In this panel we (a music teacher educator and three doctoral students) address our engagement with popular and participatory cultures to develop understanding, skills, and dispositions related to such engagement for K-12 and higher education. We demonstrate how new musicianship and musical engagement situated in participatory and popular cultures can inform contemporary approaches for music teaching and learning, broadening beyond garage band-focused approaches to address popular music and culture in music programs. We discuss key principles and concepts related to participatory culture and transforming or recontextualizing music in terms of 1) musical engagement; 2) musical learning; and 3) future practice. NOTE: The resources on this website only pertain to my portion of this panel presentation. 

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